Home » How to Survive Travelling in Australia: First-Hand Advice, Anecdotes + Warnings for Young Travelers by Rainer Krauhs
How to Survive Travelling in Australia: First-Hand Advice, Anecdotes + Warnings for Young Travelers Rainer Krauhs

How to Survive Travelling in Australia: First-Hand Advice, Anecdotes + Warnings for Young Travelers

Rainer Krauhs

Published April 11th 2014
ISBN : 9781497462793
Paperback
74 pages
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 About the Book 

This non-fiction book contains hard-earned advice on how to travel Australia and return home safe, healthy and, above all, alive. Each advice is illustrated with stories during which I learned them. Theyre all from my own travels - conducted backMoreThis non-fiction book contains hard-earned advice on how to travel Australia and return home safe, healthy and, above all, alive. Each advice is illustrated with stories during which I learned them. Theyre all from my own travels - conducted back when I was still a naive, young person. The advices are grouped and sorted by source and extent of the hazard. The biggest risk gets explained first: You. Followed by: Other people, then companies and organizations. Finally (and only then) australian cliche hazards: animals, weather, geography, natural disasters. And, since youll be travelling: transportation - alone, with others, during hikes or group travel. For example, I explain how to properly apply sunscreen (in short: every other hour, nighttime excluded) and tell about how I got a (natural!) tan while it rained. I explain to outsiders why Vegemite is good for you (and a funny way to spot the non-initiated). Dont drive a car at night - I did, and Im listing everything I barely missed (the least of that were animals). You might have been told the Police was there to protect and to serve but they dont always live up to that - I witnessed them arresting those needing help! Dont hitchhike - I tried that unsuccessfully for hours even though I were in busy places - and Im telling you about that so you wont get lost in remote Australia or meet a serial killer. Animals arent accustomed to meeting humans since the country is so spacious, so they just treat people like terrain and run across them. Road Trains arent long trucks, but deadly avalanches - unless one makes a step to the side. And I explain the importance of carrying sufficient water - because the Outback isnt just blue skies and wide open space, but the largest sauna in the world! In short: Although Australia seems to be like home. it is not. This misapprehension can cost you your life. Finally, in order not completely deter the reader from traveling, Im recounting several good experiences. For example about the drunken, gargantuan Aborigines who found my tiny elderly mother who got lost at night when visiting, and how they carefully guided her like a child. And about three tourists, standing alone at night in the middle of the desert, with a fresh glass of champagne under the stars. For readers impatient or just browsing, I here summarize advice I deem most important: * Take preventive measures. * What is unsafe to do at home is unsafe away from home. * Let someone you trust know where youre going so they can alert someone should you not arrive as planned. Tell them who to call - and then contact them when youre back in safety. * Read warning signs and follow their advice. Someone spent money and effort to put them there to save you. Recognize places and situations where no warning sign has been put up but should have been. * Drink plenty of water and bring sufficient supplies. * Wear sunscreen. * Bring a jumper.